Dirty Jobs At The Gates Of Dell: CES Keynote Analysis.

Todd Bishop has an interesting analysis of Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Michael Dell's keynotes up, using Tag Clouds and textual analysis. I think a glance at the tags is pretty revealing of the differences between Apple and Microsoft. The biggest tag in Job's cloud is "Phone" followed by "iphone" and "ipod". Clearly Steve's keynote was very focused on the ipodination of the consumer electronics market. Bill Gate's biggest tags are "great" and "devices" ("windows" and "vista" seem to come in third and fourth respectively).

I find it interesting that one of Bill's biggest tags is an adjective, whereas Steve's is a product. While Bill's keynote may have been less focused than Steve's, Apple's head salesman's highest ranking adjective (which is also great) is somewhere around fourth place. See, a lot of people think Bill's keynotes are boring compared to Steve's; and for the most part they're right. It's the same way that a cool cell phone commercial with the latest teeny popper hit is more exciting than the Discovery Channel. Steve Job's Keynote is nothing more than an advertisement for the ipod and the iphone. Bill Gate's Keynote is more about a vision, the way Microsoft would like the world to be. A lot of "Great Devices" powered by "Windows Vista". I think Bill has a far grander vision than Steve. Steve is just better at packaging his product.

As for Michael Dell... his biggest tags seemed to be gaming, home, online, great. So he's interested in "Great Home Gaming Online" it would seem. Honestly I haven't listened to Dell's keynote so I don't feel qualified to post any opinion, anyone out there that does?



***Edited: 1/15/07@10:30pm*** Figured since I made Scoble's Shared Items, I should make my post make sense. :)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

my question is should it be then or should you have used than. It is very difficult to read text that was translated from another language.

Michael.NET said...

I should I have used "than". "Then" refers to order in time, not comparisons. Thanks for pointing it out, I updated the post!